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20121111
20121111
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)
the tea party and the future of the republican party. welcome to the "washington journal." guest: thanks for having me. i'm happy to be here. host: we've got an article here from the "christian science monitor" with the headline, "will the tea party compromise"" he writes, tea partiers may be more amenable to an agreement on tax revenues now that the electorate has signaled it doesn't especially like what the tea party has been up to. he goes on to say, if there's a mandate in yesterday's results, said speaker john boehner on yesterday, it's a mandate to find a way for us to work together. republicans, he said, are willing to accept new revenue under the right conditions to get a bipartisan agreement over the budget. your thoughts about what robert reich had to say and what the speaker is saying. guest: well, you know, i think that we need to find some common ground. obviously we're facing this fiscal cliff, so we have to find some common ground. everybody's talking about revenue, nobody's talking about cutting. that's really what we need to be focusing on, because you can tax people int
in the senate and the way it operated. it was a magnet for a lot of us coming to washington. wandering the halls, and i did not know them all in the 1970's were madeleine albright, stephen breyer, susan collins, lamar alexander. many of the leaders. and in the media today, chris matthews, george will. many of these people got their training in the senate. we were not part of the greatest generation. we have the next best thing. we were trained by them. host: our next call for ira shapiro comes from barry. you have to turn down your set. we are getting feedback. caller: i just turned it down. this is why they had more democrats back then, because of the tea party. they made our government stagnant. they are upset about capitalism. that is what built our country. we send them a strong message. as americans, we need to back up the present by getting more involved with the senate. e-mail in your search senator, your congressman and even the president. -- e-mail your senator, the congressman, and even the president. host: we will leave it there. talk to us a little bit about what barry brought up. it
and that country's reaction to the reelection of president obama. "washington journal" next. host: good morning. live coverage of the president's remarks at arlington national cemetery. it was on this date in 1918 that hostilities ended in world war i. on this november 11, the country remembers those who lost their lives and paid the ultimate price varied at arlington national cemetery and other cemeteries around the country. for congress, it is a back to work week for the start of the lame-duck session including the ongoing debate over the fiscal cliff. grover norquist on the tax pledge will be one of the topics. we want to focus on whether you think the tax pledge is still relevant. give us a call. you can also join the conversation on our twitter page or send us an e-mail. let's begin with a look at some of the headlines. we are beginning with the front page of "the new york times." andpolitico has this story -- grover norquist is optimistic about the party being as strong as ever. he carries around copies of a map showing republican dominance all over the country. he insists the party is we
veterans remembrance ceremony. >> as washington likes are against this grover norquist. they are noted for the anti-tax plans. our panel of journalists, steven sloan from politico and russell berman from "the hill" >> thank you for being here. i want to talk about your interpretation of the election and what it means for the direction of tax policy. >> we had a split decision appeared the president won by two points. he won by 7.2 years ago against a war hero. he and 9 million fewer votes. he is a lame duck now. he said he was interested in raising taxes a year from now on anyone. his physician from four years ago was that they would not raise taxes on anyone. he was very clear and no taxes if you made less than $250,000. this year august 8, he started with a new framework. my plan is that i will not raise taxes on anyone who earns less than $250,000 a year. his only promising -- he is only promising not to raise income taxes. this is not include energy taxes. is only promising to protect income taxes for one year. at the end of the year, he has promised the middle-clas
, and we will talk about the economic policy implications of where we are. >> august returns to washington next week, and now we preview the commercial agenda in the land and the relationship with president obama. panelists include a former labor secretary elaine chao and president of the center for american progress, neera tanden. this is half an hour. >> see you again. all right. jared is over there. let me just real quickly -- elaine chao, now at the heritage foundation, is a former secretary of labor. alex brill, senior fellow at the american enterprise institute. neera tanden is the president of the center for american progress, formerly chief policy adviser for hillary clinton and a 2008 and 2016 -- sorry. [laughter] jared bernstein is a senior fellow at the center on budget and policy priorities, former chief economic adviser to joe biden and in 2000 and 20 -- no, sorry. we should have separated you two, actually. >> today is a day for half the purpose of the families. >> -- happy progress of families. >> we have to start with the big question. obviously, we are in a position where
. he talked to kristen welker. she's in washington with more. >> i interviewed steven boylan by phone saturday. he called petraeus a mentor and friend. boylan says he's stunned by the news about his former boss. in the meantime, new details are emerging about how this all came to light. according to multiple sources, the down fall of general david petraeus all started with a seemingly unrelated complaint to the fbi. officials say it was triggered by e-mails from paula broadwell to another woman not related to petraeus who felt she was being harassed and complained to the fbi. officials say in recent weeks, the fb icht traced the e-mails to broadwell and only stumbled on the relationship with petraeus as a result. >> my first reaction was disbelief. >> reporter: steven boylan worked with petraeus from 2005 to 2008, including in iraq. the two have remained close and spoke by phone on saturday. >> he said he had an excellent job, an exceptional family, he had had a great relationship he thought with the white house. and in his words, he screwed up. and he knows it. >> reporter: officials
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)

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